Peptic ulcers

What are they?

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Peptic ulcers are ulcers caused by the digestion of tissues by acid. This occurs in two main places: the stomach (gastric ulcer) and the first part of the small intestine called the duodenum (duodenal ulcer).

The cause of these ulcers are not well known. But a ulcer results when the activity of stomach acid overwhelms the natural defence of the stomach or intestine. In a majority of people with peptic ulcers, there is colonisation of the stomach by a type of bacterium called Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori for short). Peptic ulcers may be acute or chronic.

Most stomach ulcers are caused by taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which can lead to damage of the lining of the stomach.

Other, less common, causes of peptic ulcers include:

• Multiple organ failure, which can lead to problems with the digestive system, including

‘stress ulcers’

• A condition called Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, where a tumour leads to the production

of too much acid in the stomach

• Certain medicines

• Some infections

What are the symptoms?

The pain of duodenal ulcers may range from minor discomfort, gnawing, burning, dull ache to one of considerable severity.

Its position is typically just below the breast bone or just below the lowest rib on the right side. But it may be high up in the chest behind the breast bone or low down around the navel.

The pain may come on some 2-3 hours after a meal or when the person is hungry, and may wake the person in the middle of the night.

The pain may get better with food, vomiting or antacids like Gaviscon.

The pain of gastric ulcers come on during or soon after eating, and vomiting is frequent.

You may also get heartburn, feel bloated, or have wind. But having one or two of these symptoms doesn’t usually mean you have a stomach ulcer.

Stomach problems can sometimes be a sign of a more serious illness. If you have black stools, or you are vomiting blood, you should call your doctor or go to the emergency department as soon as possible. You could have bleeding in your stomach or your intestine.

What treatments work?

Treatment for peptic ulcers is now principally medical, and is aimed at relieving pain and enhancing healing. Healing is achieved by:

  • Eradicating H. pylori
  • Reducing or neutralising the high acid secretion

However, general measures against peptic ulcers include:

  • Having adequate rest to relieve anxiety.
  • Avoiding smoking and alcohol.
  • Proper diet management, vis avoiding foods that aggravate it as well as spices and pepper.
  • Frequent taking of antacids as directed by the doctor.

The treatment for people with an ulcer caused by H. pylori usually consists of three drugs: two antibiotics to kill the H. pylori bacteria, and a drug to reduce stomach acid while the ulcer is healing. The antibiotics must be completed, else there is a chance that not all the bacteria will be killed and the infection will return, stronger, and harder to kill than before. If this treatment doesn’t work the doctor might suggest different antibiotics, and possibly another drug called bismuth, which can help the ulcer heal.

If the ulcer is not caused by H. pylori, then it is very likely to be due to long term use of NSAIDs. Therefore, they will need to be discontinued, and the doctor may only prescribe the drug to reduce stomach acid production. This treatment usually lasts for about four weeks.

Here are some natural products you can also try for both prevention and healing of ulcers:

Nature’s Herbs Cat’s Claw Bark-Ulcer-Stomach— $8.99 (Save 30%!)

From the Peruvian highlands Uncaria tomentosa 500 mg each Nature’s Herbs Wild Countryside Cat’s Claw Bark grows in the highlands of the Peruvian Amazon. A woody vine, Cat’s Claw, also known as Uña de Gato, has been used for centuries by native Indians. Today, Cat’s Claw is the subject of ongoing scientific research 500 Mg. 100…
From the Peruvian highlands Uncaria tomentosa 500 mg each Nature’s Herbs Wild Countryside Cat’s Claw Bark grows in the highlands of the Peruvian Amazon. A woody vine, Cat’s Claw, also known as Uña de Gato, has been used for centuries by native Indians. Today, Cat’s Claw is the subject of ongoing scientific research 500 Mg. 100 Caps
8.99 USD InStock

Cat’s Claw Una De Gato Planetary Herbals — $14.99 (Save 6%!)

Cat’s Claw from Planetary Herbals Supports natural defenses within the body Features inner bark cat’s claw Planetary Herbals’ Cat’s Claw supplement features Uncaria tomentosa, a woody vine that grows in the Peruvian Amazon rain forest that indigenous peoples have utilized for hundreds of years. This cat’s claw supplement uses only…
Cat’s Claw from Planetary Herbals Supports natural defenses within the body Features inner bark cat’s claw Planetary Herbals’ Cat’s Claw supplement features Uncaria tomentosa, a woody vine that grows in the Peruvian Amazon rain forest that indigenous peoples have utilized for hundreds of years. This cat’s claw supplement uses only the inner bark of the above ground vine, which preserves the root for future growth, protecting the delicate ecosystem. 750 Mg. 90 Tabs Love, love , love this supplement!! Works great for Ulcers
14.99 USD InStock